Thursday, October 06, 2011

Advanced Beings & Reincarnation




Advanced Beings & Reincarnation: On Wednesday's show, interdisciplinary cosmologist Paul Von Ward discussed his scientific research on how "advanced beings" (ABs) have influenced our history by shaping our genes & technology, and providing the impetus for modern civilization. Rather than extraterrestrials, he prefers the term ABs, which could include ETs, 'ancient astronauts,' interdimensional beings, as well as advanced Earth species (active before our civilization began, such as Atlanteans). These beings intervened with humanity, and tinkered or intermingled with our genetics, but around 5,000--6,000 years ago, they pulled away from direct involvement with human civilization, he reported. The departure of the ABs or 'gods' from places like the Indus Valley, China, Egypt, and the Middle East left a class of interlocutors who became known as the priesthood. Over centuries of time without the gods coming back, "this priesthood continued to carry out the rituals, and request the obedience of the followers," and began to use words to describe the gods as divine beings, Von Ward said. Eventually it got to the point where the ABs had been gone so long, that it was forgotten they were real physical beings, and their concept evolved into the supernatural notion of a singular God, he continued. Von Ward also addressed his study of reincarnation and its effects on the human personality. He described the psychoplasm as the scientific concept of a soul-- a biogenetic field (or the portion of universal consciousness that is associated with an individual) that survives the physical manifestation of the body. A person's past life legacy can predispose them to certain directions, abilities, and appearances. He is currently studying a case of a poet in the American Southwest who believes she may be the reincarnation of Elizabeth Barrett Browning. An independent comparison of their poems has found significant similarities, he noted. Prozac & Teen Violence: First hour guest, Dr. Peter Breggin commented on the news that a Canadian judge agreed that Prozac contributed to a teen murder. Breggin believes the evidence shows that anti-drepressants like Prozac can possibly lead to violence and aggression in both children and adults. He detailed another case, in which a teenage girl on Prozac harbored violent fantasies about her mother, but when she stopped taking the drug, the violent ideation ceased.
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